April 19

Katherin Andrade, 24
Jennifer Andrade, 19
Aldrick Bennett, 35
Susan Benta, 31
Mary Jean Borst, 49
Pablo Cohen, 38

Yvette Fagan, 34
Doris Fagan, 60

Lisa Marie Farris, 26
Ray Friesen, 76
Dayland Gent, 3

Diana Henry, 28
Paulina Henry, 24
Phillip Henry, 22
Stephen Henry, 26
Vanessa Henry, 19
Zilla Henry, 55

Novellette Hipsman, 36
Floyd Houtman, 61

Cyrus Howell, 8
Rachel Howell, 23
Star Howell, 6

Sherri Lynn Jewell, 43

David Michael Jones, 38
Michelle Jones, 18
Serenity Sea Jones, 4

Bobbie Lane Koresh, 16 months
David Koresh, 33

Jeffery Little, 31
Nicole Elizabeth Gent Little, 24

Livingston Malcolm, 26

Douglas Wayne Martin, 42
Lisa Martin, 13
Sheila Martin, 15

Abigail Martinez, 11
Audrey Martinez, 13
Juliete Santoyo Martinez, 30
Crystal Martinez, 3
Isiah Martinez, 4
Joseph Martinez, 30

Jillane Matthews
Alison Bernadette Monbelly, 31

Melissa Morrison, 6
Rosemary Morrison, 29

Sonia Murray, 29
Theresa Noberega, 48
James Riddle, 32
Rebecca Saipaia, 24

Judy Schneider, 41
Mayanah Schneider, 2
Steve Schneider, 48

Laraine B. Silva, 40

Floracita Sonobe, 34
Scott Kojiro Sonobe, 35

Aisha Gyarfas Summers, 17
Gregory Allen Summers, 28
Startle Summers, 1

Hollywood Sylvia
Lorraine Sylvia, 40
Rachel Sylvia, 13

Doris Vaega
Margarida Joanna Vaega, 47
Neal Vaega, 37

Martin Wayne, 20
Mark H. Wendell

Rep. Lewis passed over for powerful chairmanship

Republicans passed over  Rep. Jerry Lewis in favor of a veteran Kentucky lawmaker Wednesday to chair the powerful House Appropriations Committee.

The party’s steering committee rejected Lewis’s request to waive term limits that bar him from reclaiming the post he held when Republicans last held the majority.

The decision deprives Lewis of a position that would have given him control over the federal government’s purse strings and a heightened ability to direct millions of dollars to his home district, which includes some of the Pass area.

See also: CREW’s Most Corrupt: Rep. Jerry Lewis

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Startups Backed By The CIA

The spy agency has a venture capital arm that is funding an array of companies developing bleeding-edge technologies.

Tiny cameras. Hearing devices for the teeth. Wi-fi for refrigerators. These are some of the products made by companies that have caught the eye of In-Q-Tel, the venture capital arm of the Central Intelligence Agency.

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US contacts allies about WikiLeaks move

The United States has briefed its key allies, including Britain, France, Germany and Saudi Arabia ahead of the mass release of classified documents by WikiLeaks.

Whistleblower website WikiLeaks plans to release around three million leaked documents, including cables sent to Washington from American embassies throughout the world.

The website had previously posted online secret details of US military operations in war-ravaged Iraq and Afghanistan.

United States Department of State Spokesman Philip Crowley says the United States is “gearing up for the worst-case scenario.”

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Cops & Firemen

Gun Running, Drugs and Flamenco: US Army Human Terrain System Has It All

See also:  Nature: Shut Down Army’s Human Terrain Program

A member of the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command management team in Afghanistan, according to sources, is a “gun runner.” That individual is allegedly listed in an “Federal Bureau of Investigation database” and has “ties to Ahmad Wali Khan Karzai and the drug business.”

Another Human Terrain System leader has apparently been accused by “local nationals…of being a pedophile—touching young Afghan children while out in the field and making disturbing comments about them.” Members of a US Army Stryker group in Afghanistan have made the same comments.

These comments appear outrageous but, then again, this is the US Army Human Terrain System. It’s a head-shaker that the US Army (TRADOC) and Lieutenant General William James Lennox Jr. heap praise upon it even as the US Congress, House Armed Services Committee, has said the program needs a good scrub, as reported by the authorities on HTS at Wired the Washington Independent.

HASC is to be applauded for this action. And it could not come at a better time.

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The Gun is Civilization

Human beings only have two ways to deal with one another: reason and force. If you want me to do something for you, you have a choice of either convincing me via argument, or force me to do your bidding under threat of force. Every human interaction falls into one of those two categories, without exception. Reason or force, that’s it.

In a truly moral and civilized society, people exclusively interact through persuasion. Force has no place as a valid method of social interaction, and the only thing that removes force from the menu is the personal firearm, as paradoxical as it may sound to some.

When I carry a gun, you cannot deal with me by force. You have to use reason and try to persuade me, because I have a way to negate your threat or employment of force.

The gun is the only personal weapon that puts a 100-pound woman on equal footing with a 220-pound mugger, a 75-year old retiree on equal footing with a 19-year old gang banger, and a single guy on equal footing with a carload of drunk guys with baseball bats. The gun removes the disparity in physical strength, size, or numbers between a potential attacker and a defender.

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San Bernardino County Sheriff Candidates to Participate in June 1 Forum in Big Bear

The California Statewide Direct Primary Election will be held on Tuesday, June 8, and those voters who plan to request a vote-by-mail ballot have until June 1 to do so. In addition to five statewide measures on the June 8 ballot, San Bernardino County voters will have opportunity to vote for the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools (currently Dr. Gary Thomas) and County Sheriff.

Current Sheriff for the County Rod Hoops, who in February 2009 assumed the role of outgoing Sheriff Gary Penrod, will be in Big Bear on June 1st to participate alongside Sheriff candidates and Deputy Sheriffs Paul Schrader and Mark Averbeck in a forum hosted by the Big Bear Chamber of Commerce and the Democratic Club of Big Bear Valley.

The Tuesday, June 1st candidates forum, to be held at the Municipal Water District offices at 40524 Lakeview Drive at 6:30pm, is also scheduled to include candidate for Tax Collector Ensen Mason, running against incumbent Larry Walker, and both candidates for County Assessor, current Assessor appointee Dennis Draeger and Alfred Castorena Palazzo. The San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters office can be reached at 387-8300 or via sbcrov.com.

Washington Finally Feeling Drone War Backlash

Back in early 2009, when guys like David Kilcullen and Andrew Exum warned that the American drone war in Pakistan could create more terrorists than they kill, they were pilloried by the national security establishment for their views. Since the failed Times Square bombing — a terror attack allegedly in response to the drone strikes — Kilcullen and Exum’s take is quickly becoming conventional wisdom in Washington.

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Rim of the World News interviews Candidate Paul Schrader Sheriff/Coroner of San Bernardino County

Superior Court Judge candidate Ed Montgomery endorses Paul Schrader for sheriff of San Bernardino County

It is my privilege and honor to endorse candidate Paul Schrader for the office of Sheriff in San Bernardino County.

Our community will be well served by many of Paul’s proposals and recommendations once he takes office. San Bernardino has suffered too long without an election for sheriff. It is time to move forward in the 21st century and address new technology and systems to better protect our citizens. There needs to be cooperation and understanding between our law enforcement officials and the citizens they are protecting.

Paul and his family have been out in the neighborhoods attending events and knocking on doors to get the word out about his commitment to San Bernardino County. Paul’s door will remain open to our community once he is in office. His commitment to a fresh start in San Bernardino County through public accountability and cooperation is the real deal.

I hope you will join me in voting for change for San Bernardino County on June 8, 2010.

Putting our Families and Children First,

Ed Montgomery
Candidate for Superior Court Judge, Seat #29

Oklahoma Passes Bill Outlawing Militia Recruitment

Last week the Oklahoma House of Representatives passed a bill that equates recruiting militia members to recruiting gang members.

“Recruiting membership in an unauthorized militia or the Ku Klux Klan would be a crime if legislation approved Thursday by the House of Representatives becomes law. ‘This is making unauthorized militias illegal,’ said Rep. Mike Shelton, the amendment’s author,” News OK reported on Thursday.

Shelton wants to send people to prison who do not ask the state for permission to form a militia. If the bill becomes law, it will likely be challenged as unconstitutional. However, the bill and its passage in the Oklahoma House reveals there is support on the part of lawmakers to deny citizens their rights under the First Amendment (specifically, the right to peaceably assemble).

A news report video on the law can be viewed here.

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From nose to brain: New route for chemical incapacitation?

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I first realized the power of intranasal drug delivery after reading a 2005 paper in Nature entitled “Oxytocin Increases Trust in Humans.” In it, the authors–several psychologists, neuroscientists, and economists–reported on a study based on a game that pitted two players against each other–an investor and a trustee. (You may be wondering what this has to do with oxytocin, a neuropeptide involved in mammalian social behaviour, but bear with me!) The investor has the option of donating his money to the trustee. If he does so, the experimenters add to that amount by a known multiple. The trustee then can turn around and share the rewards (from the original investment and the experimenter’s donation) with the investor or just keep the money for himself.

The possibility that the intranasal route would allow other drugs or other chemical agents to bypass the protective blood-brain barrier and allow direct access to the brain for malign purposes is deeply worrying.”

The investor, therefore, faces a dilemma–will the trustee share the money or leave him high and dry? Most people put in this situation are rather averse to placing too much trust in the trustee. However–and here is where oxytocin comes in–the experimenters were able to show that administration of oxytocin within the nose (known as intranasal administration) significantly increased the amount of trust an investor displayed when playing the game.

The initial publication led other experimenters to further investigate what was causing the extra-trusting behavior of the investor. For example, in a 2008 Neuron journal study, “Oxytocin Shapes Neural Circuitry of Trust and Trust Adaptation in Humans,” the impact of the drug on the investor’s behavior was shown to persist even after trust between the two players had been breached several times.

While there are positive implications of these discoveries–intranasal administration of oxytocin might just be helpful in decreasing anxiety–the possibility that the intranasal route would allow other drugs or chemical agents to bypass the protective blood-brain barrier and allow direct access to the brain for malign purposes is deeply worrisome. Even more troubling is that it has long been understood that such bioregulators–naturally occurring chemicals in the body that control regulatory functions such as heart rate, temperature, sleep, and mood–can exert their effects at very low concentrations in the brain. A 2006 Institute of Medicine and National Research Council joint-committee (the so-called Lemon-Relman committee) warned of the impact of bioregulators on immune, neurological, and endocrine systems. The committee also warned in their final report, Globalization, Biosecurity, and the Future of the Life Sciences, about the potential use aerosol technology, microencapsulation, nanotechnology, and gene therapy to maximize the impact of such bioregulators on the human body. Advances in the field since the report’s publication four years ago have only heightened these concerns.

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California’s Bay-Area Transit Police Stripped Of Tasers

Have we finally reached the point at which police over-use and abuse of tasers will start resulting in the danged devices being taken away? The Bay Area Rapid Transit police are losing their tasers after a police sergeant attempted to tase a 13-year-old boy on a bicycle whom he was pursuing by car. Oh, and there was last year’s fatal shooting of an unarmed, restrained man on a subway platform after a BART police officer confused his handgun with his taser. California’s KTVU reports:

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US confronts its reputation abroad

Sheriff Hopeful Schrader Pushing Department Reform

Paul Schrader says he is running for San Bernardino County sheriff because he believes “I can do a better job than what is being done now.”

In expanding on that point, Schrader said, “I am more qualified because I have a diverse background in law enforcement. I’ve worked as a supervisor in specialty positions in law enforcement including supervisor of the Los Angeles County sheriff’s legal unit, audit unit, risk analysis unit, as supervisor of operations, in the sheriff’s headquarters in Los Angeles and as a street deputy. I have a widely diverse background. I am from someplace else and have a perspective that can be utilized here. I am able to look at a department, do the basic jobs of an auditor and risk analysis teams to see what needs to be cut, where we need to reallocate funding and if we need to move manpower I can tell where we need to do that. Because I come from outside of the San Bernardino County sheriff’s department, I have a fresh pair of eyes to look at the overall structure of the department and bring a fresh start to the department.”

Schrader is challenging the incumbent, Rod Hoops, who was appointed to the post in 2009 after former sheriff Gary Penrod resigned. There is another candidate in the race, San Bernardino County sheriff’s deputy Mark Averbeck.

Already, Schrader said, he has come to some conclusions about the need for reform and reorganization in the department.

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Sheriff candidate Paul Schrader’s blog

Paul Schrader, candidate  for sheriff of San Bernardino County, now has a blog at http://sheriffpaul.wordpress.com

Paul Schrader: Transparency- San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department

The questions asked at most of my events and from people all over the county is, what are they hiding, and why is the sheriff and his command staff not open and available to the public.

As part of my fresh start approach to the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, it will be my duty to see that the Department is above reproach in order to restore and retain the respect and trust of the public. My first objective is to make all areas of the Department transparent, especially the jails. There will be an open dialogue maintained with the community and community activists who have questions regarding the Department, including the jails.

In order to bring justice to those wronged and closure to those who have done right, I will have all internal investigations expedited. The community will know the truth, and Deputies will be treated fairly and in accordance with “The Peace Officer’s Bill of Rights”.

This is the right thing to do.  Check out my website at www.sheriffpaul.net and let’s work together for a TRANSPARENT Department.

Paul Schrader: Community Responsibility- San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department

My name is Paul Schrader, and I am running for the position of Sheriff-Coroner of San Bernardino County. My campaign is based on what we call the Fresh Start Initiative. My goal is to bring a Fresh Start to San Bernardino County that the citizens can be proud of, participate in, and see concrete, forward-looking solutions to the problems we face.

Community Responsibility- A Sheriff’s Department that accepts its responsibility to the community, and works with the community to improve
conditions for all.

The other day I was in Chino Hills. I was talking with a guy by the name of John. He said he would like to see the Department executives reaching out to the community, finding out what needs and concerns they have.  He said when he has tried to reach anyone of any rank, he is directed to a patrol deputy.  He is frustrated.

While in Victor Valley I talked to Helen. She had a few of her friends with her. She said she wanted a group to help bring the Department and community together. She said the Department said she could volunteer. She tried to call the Sheriff’s Office and was redirected to a patrol deputy. She does not want to be a volunteer, she would love to be part of a community group that could partner with the Department. She is frustrated.

I hear this throughout the county. Deputies are being utilized to answer questions that should go through Department executives. Our deputies are trying to provide law enforcement services and need tools to do the job even better.

I will have community groups in every area of the county. We will meet and work together, ensuring they are getting service needed in their area. I will be available to citizens. This is being done in Departments all over the State.

Dennis L. “Pinky” Stout got the message

Today I am announcing my decision not to seek the Office of District Attorney of San Bernardino County.

From a very early age all I dreamed about was being a public prosecutor.  After 17 years as a Deputy District Attorney, I realized my ultimate dream in 1994 when I was elected District Attorney.  I ran unopposed in 1998 and was reelected to a second term. During those eight years we accomplished a complete rebuild of the office from the ground up. We implemented over 50 new programs.

We positioned the office so that it could become the best prosecutorial agency in the state.

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CNN poll confirms: Most Americans believe their government is a threat to their welfare

A majority of Americans think the federal government poses a threat to rights of Americans, according to a new national poll.

Fifty-six percent of people questioned in a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Friday say they think the federal government’s become so large and powerful that it poses an immediate threat to the rights and freedoms of ordinary citizens. Forty-four percent of those polled disagree.

The survey indicates a partisan divide on the question: only 37 percent of Democrats, 63 percent of Independents and nearly 7 in 10 Republicans say the federal government poses a threat to the rights of Americans.

According to CNN poll numbers released Sunday, Americans overwhelmingly think that the U.S. government is broken – though the public overwhelmingly holds out hope that what’s broken can be fixed.

The CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll was conducted February 12-15, with 1,023 adult Americans questioned by telephone. The survey’s sampling error is plus or minus 3 percentage points for the overall survey.

‘Hot Rod’ Mossberg Shotguns

The Mossberg 590A1 is an ideal platform for personalizing a pump-action shotgun, says Mike Shain of AIMPRO Tactical.  Shain is one of several shops that offer action jobs, Magnaporting, accesorization and cleaning, polishing and refinishing of police scatterguns. Vang Comp and Wilson Combat are two others that offer shotgun modifications. For less than $250, Shain can reduce felt recoil and muzzle jump, giving operators a shot pattern of 4 inches or less from 50 yards. “What can we do to hot rod this gun,” Shain asks, not needing an answer. “It’s a great gun out of the box, but how can we squeeze every last drop of performance out of this gun.”

RIP: DARPATech Mad-Science Fair Lives No More

The Pentagon’s biannual mad-science fair is no more. A Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency representative confirmed to IEEE Spectrum that the agency will no longer host its defense-technology showcase.

Bummer! The conferences were a favorite among defense and tech media: the latest-and-greatest in gear, gadgets and science, along with Pentagon-themed M&Ms and heaps of free swag (temporary tattoos, anyone?). The most recent DARPATech, in 2007, attracted 3,000 reporters, Pentagon officials and academics. And DARPA knows how to throw a party: The conference was held at a Marriott Hotel in Anaheim, California, across the street from Disneyland.

So why the sudden cancellation? Danger Room’s guess was on the money: At the last conference, we speculated that the best kept secret of DARPATech might be how much it costs.

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SIG Sauer Introduces Five Variations To P238 .380 Pistol

SIG Sauer has introduced a variety of new styles to the .380 ACP P238 subcompact, an all-metal frame pistol ideal for concealed carry that’s 5.5 inches long and weighs less than 1 pound.

When it was introduced a year ago, SIG offered the P238 only in two-tone or with the corrosion resistant Nitron finish. The SIG P238 is now available in five new styles.

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Manifesto of Joe Stack

If you’re reading this, you’re no doubt asking yourself, “Why did this have to happen?”  The simple truth is that it is complicated and has been coming for a long time.  The writing process, started many months ago, was intended to be therapy in the face of the looming realization that there isn’t enough therapy in the world that can fix what is really broken.  Needless to say, this rant could fill volumes with example after example if I would let it.  I find the process of writing it frustrating, tedious, and probably pointless… especially given my gross inability to gracefully articulate my thoughts in light of the storm raging in my head.  Exactly what is therapeutic about that I’m not sure, but desperate times call for desperate measures.

We are all taught as children that without laws there would be no society, only anarchy.  Sadly, starting at early ages we in this country have been brainwashed to believe that, in return for our dedication and service, our government stands for justice for all.  We are further brainwashed to believe that there is freedom in this place, and that we should be ready to lay our lives down for the noble principals represented by its founding fathers.  Remember? One of these was “no taxation without representation”.  I have spent the total years of my adulthood unlearning that crap from only a few years of my childhood.  These days anyone who really stands up for that principal is promptly labeled a “crackpot”, traitor and worse.

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Report to Congress about the USA PATRIOT Act

The U.S. Department of Justice, Office of the Inspector General, released a new report Report to Congress on Implementation of Section 1001 of the USA PATRIOT Act.

This report details “Section 1001 of the USA PATRIOT Act (Patriot Act), Public Law 107-56, directs the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ or Department) to undertake a series of actions related to claims of civil rights or civil liberties violations allegedly committed by DOJ employees. It also requires the OIG to provide semiannual reports to Congress on the implementation of the OIG’s responsibilities under Section 1001.”

DHS Controls Over Firearms

Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General Report, DHS Controls Over Firearms

This report addresses the efficacy of the Department of Homeland Security‘s management and oversight of its components to ensure that personnel are sufficiently safeguarding and controlling firearms. It is based on interviews with employees and officials of relevant agencies and institutions, direct observations, and a review of applicable documents.

Recommendations by the Office of Inspector General to the DHS Undersecretary for Management are:

• Develop department-wide policies and procedures for safeguarding and controlling firearms; and
• Assess firearm security equipment needs for each officer assigned a firearm, issue security equipment as needed, and reaffirm to each officer the requirement to always properly secure firearms.

Guns are now permitted — but not necessarily welcomed — in national parks

A federal law taking effect Monday may alter the standard checklist for many Americans as they pack to visit their national parks: insect repellent, snacks, hiking boots . . . double-barreled shotgun.

Visitors now can pack heat in any national park from Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve to Everglades National Park, provided they comply with the firearms laws of the park’s home state, according to the new law that was passed as an amendment to credit-card legislation.

In some instances, they may carry concealed and loaded firearms, including at campsites in Yosemite National Park, along trails at Yellowstone National Park and at the Grand Canyon National Park.

Gun advocates welcomed the law as overdue, saying firearms are allowed in national forests and other federal lands, many of which are next to national parks.
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A Sheriff we CAN be proud of – Paul Schrader

Man who says he spied on mosques for FBI files lawsuit

Craig Monteilh says he lives in danger.

He’s been targeted for death by Islamic extremist groups, the Romanian and Mexican mafias and white supremacist groups. One fugitive now wants his head, he claims.

Today Monteilh, a 47-year-old fitness consultant, plans to serve papers on the people he says put him in this bind – his former employer, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Irvine Police Department.

Monteilh, who says he spied on mosques for the FBI as an undercover informant, filed a lawsuit last week claiming his agency handlers violated his civil rights and put his life in danger.

“They put me in prison with no protection,” he said. “There were hits on my life. I had to do what was necessary to survive in there in defense of my own life.”

He said his FBI supervisors reneged on a promise of severance and protection after a FBI supervisor muddled an operation that would have uncovered “bomb making materials” at a mosque, according to the complaint.

The lawsuit, seeking $10 million in damages, was filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Jan. 22.

Monteilh, 47, spied on nearly a dozen mosques from July 2006 and October 2007 on the FBI’s behalf, posing as a Muslim convert, the suit alleges.

Two of the mosques were in the San Gabriel Valley, including the Al-Nabi Mosque in West Covina and the Masjid Al-Fatiha mosque in Azusa, he said.

“The government will have an opportunity to respond to these allegations in court,” said FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller. “However, the accusations appear to be an attempt to discredit law enforcement for personal gain, at the expense of the Muslim-American community.”

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Cuba Updates Firearms Registration

Havana, February 1 (RHC)—- Firearms owners in Cuba will have a one-time opportunity for registration with police authorities as of February and for two months, it was officially announced over the weekend by the island’s media outlets.

The measure is aimed at all residents on the island who own firearms without the corresponding license. As of February 12th, all firearm owners should report to the main police station in their municipalities with their weapons to comply with the registration process.

In order to legally own a firearm, people must be over the age of 18 and pass a psychological and physical examination, plus demonstrate their ability in the use the weapon.

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Proposed Law Would Extend FOIA Reach to Private Prisons

Congress is considering proposed legislation to extend the Freedom of Information Act to private prisons that contract with government agencies. At present, the companies that run private prisons say they are not subject to FOIA because they are not public agencies.

Read more about H.R. 2450 here. (Private Prison Information Act of 2009)

War Criminals: Arrest Warrants Requested

International arrest warrants have been requested for George W. Bush, Richard B. Cheney, Donald H. Rumsfeld, George J. Tenet, Condoleeza Rice and Alberto R. Gonzales at the International Criminal Court, The Hague, Netherlands.

Professor of Law Francis Anthony Boyle of the University of Illinois College of Law in Champain, United States of America, has issued a Complaint with the Prosecutor for the International Criminal Court against the above-mentioned for their practice of “extraordinary rendition” (forced disappearance of persons and subsequent torture) in Iraq and for criminal policy which constitutes Crimes against Humanity in violation of the Rome Statute which set up the ICC.

As such, the Accused (mentioned above) are deemed responsible for the commission of crimes within the territories of many States signatories of the Rome Statute, in violation of Rome Stature Articles 5 (1)(b), 7 (1)(a), 7 (1)(e), 7 (1)(g), 7(1)(h), 7(1)8i) and 7(1)(k). Despite the fact that the USA is not a signatory State, the ICC has the jurisdiction to prosecute under Article 12 (2)(a) of the Rome Statute.

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Sheriff’s deputy accused in off duty death threat faces new charge

Download: Arrest declarationINDIO – A San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department deputy facing criminal charges for allegedly holding a gun to a man’s head while off duty has been charged with an additional felony for allegedly bringing his service weapon to court on his trial date.

Richard Charles Heverly, 43, of La Verne arrived last week at the Larson Justice Center in Indio in full uniform, with his duty belt and service weapon, according to an arrest declaration written by the bailiff in the courtroom.

His trial date was postponed, and a new court date was set for Monday. Prior to the Monday court appearance, prosecutors filed criminal charges against Heverly for unlawful possession of a weapon in a public building.

When Heverly returned to the court, he was arrested on the gun charges. He was released from custody after posting $20,000 bail.

Heverly appeared in court on Wednesday to be arraigned on the new charge, but the hearing was postponed to Feb. 9. A jury trial in Heverly’s prior case is also set for that date.

Heverly remains employed by the Sheriff’s Department and is assigned to work at West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga, sheriff’s spokeswoman Arden Wiltshire said.

See also:

Trial date postponed in sheriff’s deputy’s assault case

Court May 19 for San Bernardino County sheriff’s deputy Heverly, charged with assault

Sheriff’s deputy must stand trial for alleged death threat, judge rules

Preliminary Hearing for San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Deputy Richard Heverly is Postponed

Sheriff’s deputy accused of death threats, gun charges returns to work

Back in court: Sheriff’s depupty accused of assault, threats while off duty

San Bernardino County Sheriff’s deputy Richard Heverly

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José Martí’s Anniversary Celebrated across Cuba

Havana, January 28, (RHC)—The anniversary of the birth of Cuba’s national hero, José Julián Martí Pérez, was widely celebrated across the island today. Visitors and Cubans from all over the country laid wreaths in homage to Marti at different locations. Last night thousands of young university students carried out their traditional torch light march from the steps of the Universidad de La Habana to the Museo Fragua Martiana, a center of study for the works of Jose Marti.

At 12 noon a twenty-one gun salute was sounded from the Castillo de los Tres Reyes Magos del Morro overlooking the Bay of Havana.

Jose Marti was born in 1853, in Havana. He was a writer, poet, journalist, translator and philosopher. He played an essential role in the Cuban War of Independence of 1895, by gathering funds and presenting the plight of the Cuban people abroad, unifying Cuban immigrants and making the necessary preparations for the war. He died on May 19th 1895, in the Battle of Dos Ríos. Marti’s ideology was his greatest legacy: his thoughts on independence, solidarity, the unity of Latin America and the dangers of imperialism and annexation have influenced and guided popular social movements in Latin America and Cuba, starting with Fidel Castro and the Cuban Revolution.

David Kelly post mortem to be kept secret for 70 years as doctors accuse Lord Hutton of concealing vital information

Vital evidence which could solve the mystery of the death of Government weapons inspector Dr David Christopher Kelly will be kept under wraps for up to 70 years.

In a draconian – and highly unusual – order, Lord Hutton, the peer who chaired the controversial inquiry into the Dr Kelly scandal, has secretly barred the release of all medical records, including the results of the post mortem, and unpublished evidence.

The move, which will stoke fresh speculation about the true circumstances of Dr Kelly’s death, comes just days before Tony Blair appears before the Chilcot Inquiry into the Iraq War.

It is also bound to revive claims of an establishment cover-up and fresh questions about the verdict that Dr Kelly killed himself.

Tonight, Dr Michael Powers QC, a doctor campaigning to overturn the Hutton findings, said: ‘What is it about David Kelly’s death which is so secret as to justify these reports being kept out of the public domain for 70 years?’

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Moscow: Exam to be required for firearms

The goal of the exam is to explain to people the correct use of personal arms.

Becoming a gun owner – for hunting, civil use, or self-defense – will now be only possible after passing an examination – a process similar to the one a person undergoes to obtain their driver’s license, for example. The new rule has been designed for those coming to a police station for the first time to apply for a gun: gas or traumatic.

This is the first time such exams are being administered in Moscow. And, that is understandable: the capital – is the most armed city in the country, where 446,000 civil gun owners, who own more than 574,000 varieties of guns are registered. More than 32,000 of these owners possess rifles and 213,000 – smoothbore firearms. In total, there are about 5 million guns registered in Russia.

Their number continues to increase annually by 5-6%. The number of crimes in which these guns are used is also increasing.

Most often, these are spontaneous rather than premeditated crimes – triggered by emotions or simple carelessness – accidents, so to speak. Last year, 32 criminal cases were filed in the capital – three of which included murder.

So as to avoid such “accidents” or “foolishness” in the future, these exams have been introduced for new gun owners.

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United Nations report blasts US over human rights abuses

A United Nations report says the US has been violating basic human rights by kidnapping and holding terrorism suspects in secret detention centers during the past nine years.

The US is among dozens of countries that have kidnapped suspects, four independent UN rights investigators said in a year-long study based on flight data and interviews with 30 former detainees.

“On a global scale, secret detention in connection with counter-terrorist policies remains a serious problem,” they wrote in the 226-page report which is expected to be presented to the UN Human Rights Council in March.

“Secret detention as such may constitute torture or ill-treatment for the direct victims as well as their families,” the report said.

Victims and their families deserve compensation and those responsible should be prosecuted, said the four independent investigators.

The UN report explained that the purpose of the secret detentions was to cover up torture and inhuman treatment of the detainees in an effort to obtain information or silent the subjects.

The rights investigators said running facilities such as those used by the Nazis, the Soviet gulag system and Latin American dictatorships in the 1970s and ’80s, was banned under the internationally recognized laws laid out in the Geneva Conventions.

They also said establishment of secret detention could not be justified under any circumstances, including during states of emergency or armed conflict.
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Student: ‘Beating So Bad Thought I Was Going To Die’

PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh Bureau of Police Chief Nate Harper said three plainclothes officers have been reassigned during an internal investigation into the beating of an 18-year-old student violinist from the city’s Pittsburgh Creative and Performing Arts 6–12.

Police charged Jordan Miles, 18, with assault and resisting arrest Jan. 11 because, they said, he fought with the officers who thought a “heavy object” in his coat was a gun. It turned out to be a bottle of Mountain Dew.

Miles said he resisted because he thought the men were trying to abduct him and didn’t identify themselves as police

Miles’s family and attorney said he was hit with a stun gun and hospitalized after the violent Homewood struggle during which a chunk of his hair was yanked out and a tree branch went through his gums.

“I was accused for something I never had anything to do with,” said Miles, an honor student at CAPA. “I was completely innocent. They couldn’t find anything.”

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Most U.S. Union Members Are Working for the Government, New Data Shows

[ You allow your police to form labor unions, then think you can ever be free from crime?  Or free at all?  Stupid Merikins. ]

For the first time in American history, a majority of union members are government workers rather than private-sector employees, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced on Friday.

In its annual report on union membership, the bureau undercut the longstanding notion that union members are overwhelmingly blue-collar factory workers. It found that membership fell so fast in the private sector in 2009 that the 7.9 million unionized public-sector workers easily outnumbered those in the private sector, where labor’s ranks shrank to 7.4 million, from 8.2 million in 2008.

“There has been steady growth among union members in the public sector, but I’m a little bit shocked to see that the lines have actually crossed,” said Randel K. Johnson, senior vice president for labor at the United States Chamber of Commerce.

According to the labor bureau, 7.2 percent of private-sector workers were union members last year, down from 7.6 percent the previous year. That, labor historians said, was the lowest percentage of private-sector workers in unions since 1900.

Among government workers, union membership grew to 37.4 percent last year, from 36.8 percent in 2008.

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‘Bomb detector’ maker Jim McCormick arrested

The director of a company which sold a bomb-detecting device to 20 countries, including Iraq, has been arrested.

ATSC‘s Jim McCormick, 53, was detained on Friday on suspicion of fraud by misrepresentation, Avon and Somerset police said. He has since been bailed.

It comes after a BBC investigation alleged the ADE-651 did not work.

Earlier, the British government announced a ban on the export of the device to Iraq and Afghanistan, where British forces are serving.

Anti-theft tag

Mr McCormick has said the device, sold from offices in rural Somerset, used special electronic cards slotted into it to detect explosives.

But a BBC Newsnight investigation reported that a computer laboratory said the card it examined contained only a tag used by shops to prevent theft.

There are concerns the detectors have failed to stop bomb attacks which have killed hundreds of people.

The device consists of a swiveling aerial mounted to a hinge on a hand-grip. It does not operate by battery, instead promotional material says it is powered only by the user’s static electricity.

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British firm unveils anti-pirate water cannon

A British company has developed a water cannon which could be used to prevent pirates from boarding commercial ships at sea, the BBC reported.

The BBC said on its website on Friday that the Dasic Marine company, which specializes in manufacturing devices to clean marine equipment, has already started the production of the cannons that “fire out high-pressure water down the sides of the vessel.”

The automated rotating cannons could be connected to the fire hose present on all merchant ships, and could be remotely-controlled by the crew to avoid exposure to gunfire.

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Mystery surrounds arrest of renegade CIA agent in Indonesia

In January of 2008, a man with an American accent appeared at a passport office in the popular West Java tourist resort of Bogor, Indonesia, and applied for an Indonesian passport. But his inability to speak Bahasa Indonesia triggered the suspicion of passport officials, who subsequently discovered that his Indonesian birth certificate was faked.

He was arrested on the spot, but it took nearly a year for Indonesian authorities to ascertain the man’s real identity: he was Bob Marshall, a 61-year-old American-born former Central Intelligence Agency agent who allegedly went renegade on the Agency in 1974.

For the past 35 years, Marshall has reportedly been cited in dozens of countries, operating a worldwide arms smuggling and check-fraud network. There are rumors at Interpol that Marshall has made use of no fewer than 40 passports during this time, some of which he acquired while working for the CIA. Marshall’s arrest is a subject of intense speculation in Indonesia –a longtime hub of CIA activity– but has barely made news in the US.

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Militias Penetrated Colombia Spy Agency by 1990

BOGOTA – The leaders of the right-wing AUC (Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia) militia federation infiltrated the highest levels of Colombia’s DAS intelligence agency (Departamento Administrativo de Seguridad) by the beginning of the 1990s, El Tiempo newspaper reported Monday, citing sources in the Inspector General’s Office.

AUC founder Carlos Castaño Gil and his brother Fidel Castaño Gil, both now dead, managed to obtain the cooperation of highly placed officials in DAS, the newspaper said.

The Castaños’ penetration of DAS played a role in the April 1990 assassination of presidential candidate Carlos Pizarro Leongómez and in at least a half-dozen other politically motivated killings, the unnamed sources told El Tiempo.
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Paul Schrader announces candidacy for San Bernardino County Sheriff

PRESS RELEASE January 19, 2010

ELECT PAUL SCHRADER FOR A FRESH START

Paul Schrader has announced his candidacy for sheriff of San Bernardino County in the June 2010 election.

Mr. Schrader has 27 years of law enforcement experience at city, county and federal levels. He currently works as a Deputy Sheriff Bonus One with the Los Angeles Sheriffs Department.

Raised in Arkansas, Paul Schrader was taught that hard work and dedication pay off. He was active in his community as a Boy Scout and a law enforcement Explorer. He worked with youth in bike safety programs and as a camp adviser.

After graduating from high school, Mr. Schrader enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and was sent to San Diego boot camp. He then became part of 1st Marines as an infantryman.

Two years later, he joined the military police, and was then assigned to work as an undercover narcotics operative at the Naval Investigative Intelligence Service (NIS).

Paul continued his career in law enforcement for the next 25 years working in city, county and federal positions in the jails as a supervisor, logistics team member, patrol member, legal unit supervisor, audit team supervisor, risk analysis team  supervisor, film/media relations/operations supervisor and on a merger team of two agencies as a supervisor. He has completed 50 units toward his degree in Administration of Justice. He is continuing his education.

Paul has taken several training classes throughout his career and received several law enforcement awards.

A dedicated family man, Paul Schrader, 47, and his wife Judith Bell Schrader have been married for 21 years and live in Rancho Cucamonga. They have five children: Abby, Anna, Amy, Amber and April. Paul has a strong family investment to keep San Bernardino County safe.

Paul was elected as President for 2 years, then Vice-President, in his home owners association.  Paul was able to maintain a budget, and never raise dues in a community of 540 homes. During this past year, Paul has appeared on the TV show NBC the Filter with Fred Rogginas a political contributor. Paul and his family are active in their church, Water of Life in Fontana. They go with the church several times a year to help feed the homeless at skid row in Los Angeles. He is also active at the Churchs new food warehouse in Fontana, helping feed the poor.

Paul Schrader is committed to bringing a fresh start to the San Bernardino Sheriffs Department, by drawing from his years of public service experience, along with training, innovation and technology. Paul will inspire the sworn staff and professional staff to enforce the law in a fair manner and defend the rights of all. He is dedicated to make San Bernardino County a safe place to live, work and raise a family, by promoting strong law enforcement and public partnerships that will enhance the quality of life within our communities.

I, Paul Schrader, approve this press release. My e-mail address is SheriffPaul@Charter.Net

For more information on upcoming events, go to my Facebook page:

Elect Paul Schrader for Sheriff.My website www.sheriffpaul.net will be coming soon.

Thanks,

Paul Schrader

Smith & Wesson Executive Indicted

A Smith & Wesson Holding Corp. sales executive and a former Secret Service official were among 22 officials at companies that supply law enforcement and the military who were charged with violating U.S. anti-bribery laws.

Amaro Goncalves, vice president of sales at Smith & Wesson, and R. Patrick Caldwell, chief executive officer of Protective Products Of America Inc. and a former deputy director of the U.S. Secret Service, were among the individuals indicted for engaging in schemes to bribe foreign officials, Assistant U.S. Attorney General Lanny Breuer said today in a statement.

The indictments, which name only the individuals and not the companies they work for, stem from a Federal Bureau of Investigation undercover operation that focused on bribery allegations in the military and law-enforcement products industry, Breuer said. Yesterday, 21 defendants were arrested at a convention in Las Vegas and one was arrested in Miami, the government said.

The indictments unsealed today in Washington represent the largest single investigation and prosecution against individuals under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the Department of Justice said. The law prohibits U.S. citizens and companies from paying bribes to foreign officials to gain business. The indictments were returned Dec. 11 by a grand jury in Washington.

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The Universal Soldier

He’s five foot-two, and he’s six feet-four,
He fights with missiles and with spears.
He’s all of thirty-one, and he’s only seventeen,
Been a soldier for a thousand years.

He’a a Catholic, a Hindu, an Atheist, a Jain,
A Buddhist and a Baptist and a Jew.
And he knows he shouldn’t kill,
And he knows he always will,
Kill you for me my friend and me for you.

And he’s fighting for Canada,
He’s fighting for France,
He’s fighting for the USA,
And he’s fighting for the Russians,
And he’s fighting for Japan,
And he thinks we’ll put an end to war this way.

And he’s fighting for Democracy,
He’s fighting for the Reds,
He says it’s for the peace of all.
He’s the one who must decide,
Who’s to live and who’s to die,
And he never sees the writing on the wall.

But without him,
How would Hitler have condemned him at Dachau?
Without him Caesar would have stood alone,
He’s the one who gives his body
As a weapon of the war,
And without him all this killing can’t go on.

He’s the Universal Soldier and he really is to blame,
His orders come from far away no more,
They come from here and there and you and me,
And brothers can’t you see,
This is not the way we put the end to war.

Chords:- F,G7,C,Am Dm,Em

Vices are Not Crimes

This article is taken from Murray Newton Rothbard‘s introduction to Vices Are Not Crimes: A Vindication of Moral Liberty by Lysander Spooner. It is also available in PDF along with the full Spooner essay.

We are all indebted to Carl Watner for uncovering an unknown work by the great Lysander Spooner, one that managed to escape the editor of Spooner’s Collected Works.

Both the title and the substance of “Vices are not Crimes” highlight the unique role that morality and moral principle had for Spooner among the anarchists and libertarians of his day. For Spooner was the last of the great natural rights theorists among anarchists, classical liberals, or moral theorists generally; the doughty old heir of the natural law–natural rights tradition of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was fighting a rearguard battle against the collapse of the idea of a scientific or rational morality, or of the science of justice or of individual right.

Not only had natural law and natural rights given way throughout society to the arbitrary rule of utilitarian calculation or nihilistic whim, but the same degenerative process had occurred among libertarians and anarchists as well. Spooner knew that the foundation for individual rights and liberty was tinsel if all values and ethics were arbitrary and subjective.

Yet, even in his own anarchist movement Spooner was the last of the Old Guard believers in natural rights; his successors in the individualist-anarchist movement, led by Benjamin Ricketson Tucker, all proclaimed arbitrary whim and might-makes-right as the foundation of libertarian moral theory. And yet, Spooner knew that this was no foundation at all; for the State is far mightier than any individual, and if the individual cannot use a theory of justice as his armor against State oppression, then he has no solid base from which to roll back and defeat it.

With his emphasis on cognitive moral principles and natural rights, Spooner must have looked hopelessly old-fashioned to Tucker and the young anarchists of the 1870s and 1880s. And yet now, a century later, it is the latter’s once fashionable nihilism and tough amoralism that strike us as being empty and destructive of the very liberty they all tried hard to bring about. We are now beginning to recapture the once-great tradition of an objectively grounded rights of the individual. In philosophy, in economics, in social analysis, we are beginning to see that the tossing aside of moral rights was not the brave new world it once seemed – but rather a long and disastrous detour in political philosophy that is now fortunately drawing to a close.

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Skip spine stabilization and get directly to the hospital

In a study that runs counter to emergency-care protocols in some regions of the United States, researchers have found that gunshot patients who undergo spine stabilization before being transported to the hospital are twice as likely to die as those who are taken directly.

The problem appears to be delay, researchers report in the January Journal of Trauma. To stabilize the spine, paramedics wrap a cervical collar around a patient’s neck and strap the individual to a long board to keep the vertebrae from shifting during transport. Although these measures immobilize the spine, the patient loses precious minutes.

“Some injuries are very time sensitive,” says study coauthor Elliott R. Haut, a trauma surgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, which averages one gunshot patient per day. “Sometimes, if you get here in 10 minutes we can save your life, but in 20 minutes we can’t,” he says. Spine immobilization delays a trip to the hospital by two or three minutes on average, but can take more than five minutes, previous research has shown.

Although spine stabilization has proved its worth for car-crash patients, no studies had established whether it helps patients with neck or torso wounds from gunshots or knifings, where wounds might include spine damage. So Haut and his colleagues scanned a nationwide database of roughly 45,000 patients treated for such wounds. About 15 percent of patients who received spine immobilization died in the hospital, compared with 7 percent of those not immobilized. When the researchers accounted for differences in wound severity, gender, race and age, the difference remained twofold.

Undergoing spine immobilization didn’t affect death rates from knife wounds. The gunshot wound patients most affected by the immobilization procedure were those with low blood pressure.

Patients with partial spine damage from trauma harbor the greatest risk of vertebrae movement during transport and are most likely to benefit from spine stabilization.

But those cases are rare among gunshot victims, says neurosurgeon Craig H. Rabb of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. The greater death rate among people in this study who got spine immobilization underscores that delay is the enemy, he says. “This provides powerful evidence that [paramedics and EMTs] should feel reassured that they’re unlikely to cause problems” by forgoing immobilization for gunshot patients, Rabb says.

The protocols that govern ambulance crews’ emergency medical care vary by state and locality. Haut says the new findings should be factored into these guidelines.

North Carolina State Senator, a gun control advocate, shoots intruder

What would you think if a long-time gun control advocate ended up shooting someone?  Might the word “hypocrite” come to mind?

It did for me, and apparently for many others.

The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports North Carolina state senator R. C. Soles shot one of two intruders who attempted to break into his house.

But it gets even more interesting than the mere hypocrisy of a gun control activist shooting somebody.

The New York Times reports Soles won’t be seeking re-election, which is not a surprise since state prosecutors have said they plan to charge Soles because “he acted criminally when he shot a former law client.”

www.dakotavoice.com

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